PreservationDirectory.com
PreservationDirectory.com
 
home
preservation events & conferences
press releases & job postings
› main menu
› article guidelines
› submit an article
grants & funding sources
heritage marketing services
preservation library:
articles, regulations & policy
preservation organizations
& resources
museums & historic structures
historic real estate
preservation businesses,
products & services
historic lodging:
inns, b&b's, hotels
historic tours
preservation general resources
historic photo galleries
preservation bookstore
frequently asked questions
about us
join email list
contact us
site map


member login

Featured
Property For Sale
View more information about this historic property for sale in St Petersburg, Florida

Historic Castle Home located in Old Northeast St Petersburg

St Petersburg, FL
PreservationDirectory.com
30 Bromley Road
Pittsford, NY 14534
Phone: (503) 308-0500

Email Us!
foo




Atlas Preservation

Mad Dog Primer

University of Oregon



PreservationDirectory.com

Call for Papers & Educational Programs in Preservation     


Call for Papers & Educational Programs in Preservation
Back to Press Releases Print   Submit an Article
Fort Ticonderoga Dedicates the Deborah Clarke Mars Education Center
Historic Preservation Blog from PreservationDirectory.com - Fort Ticonderoga Association, Education Center
Contributed By: Marci Hall
Email The Author: MHall@fort-ticonderoga.org
Website: http://www.fort-ticonderoga.org

The Center, designed by Tonetti Associates Architects, combines the restoration of an 18th-century French military warehouse with a state-of-the-art 21st-century learning center.

Ticonderoga, NY, July 6, 2008:  Fort Ticonderoga Association dedicates the new Deborah Clarke Mars Education Center on the parade ground of this National Historic Landmark.  Designed by Tonetti Associates Architects, the Center combines historical fidelity with contemporary design imperatives:  the building is a faithful reconstruction of an 18th-century magasin du Roi on the outside, with a 21st-century education and visitor center inside while incorporating features that will earn it a LEED “green building” rating.

When visitors walk through the arch onto the Fort’s central parade ground, they’ll see a structure with French-style masonry and details, reflecting the secure warehouse built during the French and Indian War.  “The original building was blown up by retreating French troops in 1759,” says Andrew B. Wright AIA LEED AP, Tonetti Associate Architects’ Partner-in-Charge on the project, “so, for the first time in almost two hundred and fifty years, the core structures of the Fort will be complete.  Timed with the Fort’s 100th season as an historic open-air museum, this is a very special event.”  The new Center will allow the museum to remain open year-round for the first time in its history.

Not only is the building an accurate reflection of its predecessor, but – in keeping with the Fort’s longstanding commitment to environmental stewardship – it’s a forward-thinking “green” building.  Early in the design process, Fort Ticonderoga Director Nicholas Westbrook made a commitment to reduce the building’s impact on the environment as much as possible.  Despite the strictures of fitting a “green” building into an 18th-century envelope, the Mars Education Center is slated to receive a LEED Silver rating.

The LEED rating was achieved through both careful building practices and selection of materials.  Stone used for the exterior was quarried from a ledge less than a mile from the Fort itself; the quarried stone, unsuitable for use in the building, was recycled into a sedimentation pond at nearby Haque Brook to reduce run off into lake George. The feature with the largest reduction in energy use, however, is the geothermal heating and cooling system that serves the entire building, using heat pumps from three deep wells to take advantage of the earth’s natural energy.  Though initially met with some skepticism on the part of the work crew, the system made believers of them on its first day of operation, when crew members reported that the building was “too hot” in the middle of a Ticonderoga January. 

Inside the building, visitors will find a robust, 21st-century education center complete with electronically equipped classrooms, exhibit spaces, production spaces for television, radio and newspaper interviews, a museum store, a central Great Hall, and what the museum calls “essential mingling spaces.”  A visitor who attended a spring preview of the building for the museum’s annual Seven Years’ War conference called it “a Fabergé jewel of a building,” while another commented:  “The word experience describes it best:  a total immersive, interactive, educational, entertaining and fun experience.”

Research for the project spanned three countries and two continents.  It started with the Fort’s superior collection of 18th-century maps and diaries, and included Canadian sources at Fortress Louisbourg in Cape Breton, Vieux-Montréal, Québec; French sources at the coastal fortifications of Normandy and Brittany; and American sources at the New York Public Library, the library of the New York Historical Society, and the New York State Library in Albany. 


Keywords: Fort Ticonderoga Association, Education Center

Posted: August 18, 2008
Back to Press Releases Print   Submit an Article


Unless noted, the thoughts and opinions expressed in the article are solely that of the
author and not necessarily the opinion of the editors of PreservationDirectory.com.
   



PreservationDirectory.com | preservation events & conferences | press releases & job postings | organizations & resources
museums & historic structures | historic real estate | preservation businesses, products & services | historic lodging
historic tours | preservation general resources | historic photo galleries | preservation bookstore | preservation library
frequently asked questions | about us | join email list | heritage marketing services | contact us | site map

© Copyright 2019 - PreservationDirectory.com | website by Stolutions